Philips Digital Healthcare Conclave 2017 #ConnectedCare In Focus by Sagay Mary, @hisagay


What if expensive, specialized patient monitoring systems in ICUs could be replaced with discreet sensors that transmitted all the vital health data directly to the doctors’ smartphones? What if the data could be analysed to deliver intelligible insights as well? Not only would it ensure better quality of care, it would also help bring down equipment and overhead costs for the hospital by eliminating expensive equipment and by even allowing patients to be cared for at home. The good news is that, this is not a hypothetical scenario but a real possibility as technology makes connected healthcare a reality.


The 2017 edition of the Philips Healthcare Conclave held on 28th July 2017 addressed the confluence of technology and healthcare and its significant impact on patient care, accessibility, and affordability. The conference shed light on why Connected Healthcare is the need of the hour for our country and how it can solve the existing healthcare problems. The conference was graced by the presence of industry stalwarts like Dr. Shalini Rajneesh, Principal Secretary Family and Health Welfare, Government of Karnataka and Dr. Pramod K. Varma, Chief Architect, Aadhaar. The speakers discussed how Connected Care and AI supported by UIDAI (Aadhaar) could help in addressing the challenges faced by the Indian Healthcare System. 

The discussion also highlighted The National Healthcare Policy 2017, which talks about how Connected Healthcare is the solution to the existing healthcare problems in India. The policy suggests the setting up of a National Digital Health Authority (NDHA) to regulate, develop and deploy digital health across the continuum of care using digital technologies. It highlights the role of Aadhaar to make connected healthcare a reality by establishing a seamless and efficient National Health Information Network. The panel also discussed how Philips has been at the forefront of using digital technology in healthcare. Its various connected care solutions have increased accessibility to care in remotest corners of the world, empowered patients to manage their health while also giving health providers tools to improve patient outcomes. With a mission to touch more than 3 billion lives by 2025, Philips is working towards creating meaningful innovations that will make Healthcare accessible to all.

Affordability, accessibility and the over-all ecosystem were in sharp focus through all the discussions during the day. All the speakers emphasized that a comprehensive overhaul of existing healthcare frameworks cannot happen in isolation; it requires a supportive ecosystem to be sustainable and scalable. The ecosystem ranges from primary health care centers and doctors to healthcare technology companies and start-ups. Most importantly, in a Connected Healthcare scenario, Internet networks and seamless connectivity are just as important as any directly medical element. The speakers almost unanimously agreed that a connected healthcare system in India needs both the private and public sectors to work in tandem.

The conference saw industry thought leaders emphasizing the current state of readiness for implementing connected care systems in India, as well the areas that need attention. Technology stacks like Aadhar are already in place, ready for both public and private enterprises to build comprehensive healthcare solutions on. At this juncture, it is important to focus on developing and empowering the macro ecosystem to work with digital systems. From education and awareness programs to data security protocols and legal frameworks, both government as well as the private sector needs to work together to ensure a robust and workable system.

 As with any major technology disruption, people are at the crux of the move to Connected Healthcare systems. The speakers stressed the fact that doctors will remain relevant even in the future tech enabled state of healthcare, and be empowered to better diagnose and treat their patients with the use of technology. The conference also highlighted the fact that ultimately, digital healthcare systems will go a long way in reducing costs. Currently, Karnataka alone spends more than Rs. 6000 crores to extend healthcare services to just 5 percent of its total population. Connected Healthcare systems have the potential to guarantee universal access to quality healthcare with seamless links between hospitals and people.  

Affordability, accessibility and adoption were hot topics within the healthcare sector even about 30 years ago. While they still remain in focus three decades later, now for the first time, there is a strong glimmer of hope, as technology makes it easier to find answers to these challenges. As the experts at the conclave pointed out, the world has just scratched the surface of Connected Healthcare, the possibilities are endless and future looks bright. 

Author
Sagay Mary

Manager, Corporate Communications at Philips, Bangalore responsible for branding and communications
Advertisements

#IoHT is already delivering tangible cost savings, but continuous investment is essential – Accenture

Image Source: https://www.accenture.com/us-en/insight-accenture-2017-internet-health-things-survey

The Internet of Health Things (IoHT) is already delivering tangible cost savings, but continuous investment is essential


In a recently published report by Accenture [2], based on a survey of 77 Healthcare payers and 77 Healthcare providers in the US, the reports findings indicate that healthcare leaders are at risk of missing out on substantial cost savings, if they don’t take the full advantage of Internet of Health Things (IoHT).


The report indicated that by introducing more connectivity, remote monitoring, and information gathering IoHT can encourage more informed decisions, better use of resources and empowering healthcare users.

According to estimates, the value of IoHT will top US$163 billion by 2020, with a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 38.1 percent between 2015 and 2020.[1] Within the next five years the healthcare sector is projected to be #1 in the top 10 industries for Internet of Things app development.[2]

What is Internet of Health Things?

Internet of Health Things (IoHT) is the integration of the physical and digital worlds through objects with network connectivity in the healthcare industry. IoHT transforms raw data in simple, actionable information and communicates with other objects, machines or people. IoHT can be leveraged to improve access to health, quality of care, consumer experience and operational efficiency 

Source: Accenture Report
Source: Accenture Report








The report lists four major takeaways for the payors and providers

The Time is Now

Despite challenges with security and privacy, inaction is not an option. There are players outside of traditional healthcare organizations looking at these same industry challenges and considering ways to capture the opportunity. If providers and payers do not invest in demonstrating IoHT value now, they risk losing out to non-traditional players. Going forward, providers and payers must identify parts of the business where IoHT solutions may be applied to do things differently—and do different things to grow in the long-term.

Measure and Build on Successes

Providers and payers have already demonstrated value through IoHT—but they need to continue investments to better understand where programs are successful to prepare for future scaling. They need to measure effectiveness beyond the technology and then build on those areas of effectiveness quickly to offer value across the business. By demonstrating the benefits and best practices, providers and payers can strengthen business cases, encourage adoption and drive interoperability.

Put consumers First

Providers and payers must continue to incorporate IoHT solutions that drive better experiences and healthier patient outcomes, along with key medical and administrative cost savings initiatives. IoHT solutions offer the seamless collection of patient-generated health data, enabling providers and payers to provide more convenient, personalized and effective care. They must train their workforces to make IoHT a part of the “new normal.”

Form Nimble Partnerships

Technology and innovation partners can help payers and providers quickly test and learn how IoHT can drive business value to inform future scaling requirements. Strategy and change management partners can help to integrate these new technologies into their workflow, culture and training. 

Key Findings of the Survey

  • 73% consider IoHT to be a major change, and consider IoHT to be a major disruptor in three years. 
  • however, 49% say the leadership at these organisations are yet to understand the potential of IoHT. 
  • As IT investments are going up so are the IoHT investments seeing to become a major budget line item.
  • Healthcare providers and payors are investing in IoHT in three areas of their businesses – RPM, wellness and operations. And these organisations are reporting real benefits from the initial programs.
  • While 57 percent of healthcare organizations surveyed say that their IT departments lead the IoHT charge, 26 percent say their research and development (R&D) divisions are leading their IoHT efforts and one in ten organizations even have dedicated IoHT subsidiaries or business units.
  • RPM Based IoHT: 33% of PROVIDERS report extensive operational cost savings from their RPM IoHT programs. 42% of PAYERS report extensive medical cost savings from their RPM IoHT programs. 
  • The majority of both providers’ (76%) and payers’(75%) RPM IoHT investments are focused on cardiac conditions. Interestingly, in the past, behavioral health has not received investment at similar levels to traditional high-cost areas such as cardiac, but the spotlight appears to now be shining on this area. Mental health, including behavioral health, is a relatively high priority for both providers (48 percent) and payers (55 percent)
Source: Accenture Report, [2]


References

[1] “The Internet Of Medical Things–What Healthcare Marketers Need to Know Now,” January 2016, Victoria Petrock: Contributors: Annalise Clayton, Maria Minsker, Jennifer Pearson, eMarketer.

[2] Accenture 2017 Internet of Health Things Survey 
https://www.accenture.com/us-en/insight-accenture-2017-internet-health-things-survey


And there you go, its fairly simple and we look forward to you sharing your experiences with our community of readers. We appreciate you considering sharing your knowledge via The HCITExpert Blog

Team @HCITExperts
Author
Team HCITExperts

Your partner in Digital Health Transformation using innovative and insightful ideas

What is #ConnectedCare? Is the Healthcare Industry ready to embrace it in India?

During the recently held #PhilipsChat the from Philips Healthcare set the agenda to discuss various aspects of what is Connected Care? 
(http://blog.hcitexpert.com/p/connected-medical-devices.html

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.jsWhenever a TweetChat is held, the moderator puts out an agenda for the discussion. Once its time, the participants share their point of view by Tweeting out their responses to the questions, tweeted by the moderator. 


The Connected Care #PhilipsChat questions follow and I Look forward to You sharing your thoughts and point of view on the role of Connected Care in Healthcare: 

1. How would you explain connected care in one line? 
2. Is the healthcare industry ready to embrace connected care?
3. How are your organization using connected care? Since when?
4. Based on your experience, what are the elements to enable connected care further?
5. How are you involving policy makers to embrace connected care?

If we take these questions with an india context, how connected care can enable the affordability and accessibility to healthcare in India. These are the most often mentioned aspects of Healthcare, that needs to be addressed by not only the government, but also the Startup community willing to disrupt the Health Tech / Digital Health industry. 

I have attempted to share my thoughts on Connected Care questions put forward during the tweetchat and I hope you will consider sharing your insights by filling in the form below

1. How would you explain connected care in one tweet?

An always connected channel of communication of care between the patient and provider, from “touch time” to “face time”  

2. Is the healthcare industry ready to embrace connected care?

In India, with the major push for digital services by the govt and private healthcare facilities, and with 350+MN internet users connected care is the only way to solve the accessibility to healthcare problem (1:3200 doctor to patient ratio)

4. Based on your experience, what are the elements to enable connected care further?

The connected care needs to bring about change in thought of how to use a connected care framework for the patient as well as the doctor. 

For the patient, connected care is about 
– experience that enables an ease of access to care
– Ability to build their own healthcare record’s completeness 
– Have a better set of processes and #workflows to manage their health and care 
– Have the ability to find “patients like me” and be part of the community 

For the Doctor, I believe it will be about 
– how to glean new insights from the data stream
– How to collaborate with a patient via an always connected model? What signifies the end of a consultation? 
– To build constantly evolving care plans for their patients, based on realtime, near-realtime, time-delay, or frequency per day/week month updates
– To evolve more treatment plans based on the insights that can be drawn from the raw patient data feed (an e.g.)
– How to build a community and be part of a community of specialists to keep themselves up-to-date on the current research and practices.


I am including the Questions as a Google Form, do consider sharing your insights into what is Connected Care? And how do you see it being enabled for the benefit of the patients and clinicians.

Author

[tab]
[content title=”About Manish Sharma” icon=”fa-heart”]

Manish Sharma

Founder HCITExpert.com, Digital Health Entrepreneur

Connect with me via any of my Social Media Channels

[/content]
[content title=”Latest Articles”]

[/content] [/tab]

Continuous Glucose Monitoring Made Affordable and Accessible by Piyush Gupta @Ambrosia_Sys

Living with diabetes comes with many challenges. At the top of the list is monitoring glucose levels to avoid a health crisis. Monitoring can be inconvenient and expensive, but thanks to advances in technology, these issues are being addressed like never before.


Dealing With Diabetes
Diabetes relates to the body’s ability to produce and process the hormone insulin. Without it, cells cannot absorb sugar, or glucose, which we need for energy.


Diabetics are typically diagnosed with one of two types of the disease: Type 1 or Type 2. Type 1 is when the body produces no insulin. The immune system destroys the cells that release it. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body is not producing enough insulin, or the levels produced are not sufficient to help the body generate energy.

In either case, the person diagnosed must make lifestyle changes to ensure glucose levels are kept in check. According to the American Diabetes Association, individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes should work out at least 2 hours/wk spread over 3 days/wk with no more than 2 consecutive days without exercise. The ADA also recommends nutritional counselling to address eating patterns, including lowering carbohydrates, fat intake and adding fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy to your diet. Of course, there is no one-size-fits-all program, and it’s important to consult your doctor to determine the dietary, exercise and behavioural changes that are best for you.

By The Numbers

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 29.1 million people or 9.3% of the US population has diabetes. Type 2 diabetes accounts for the largest group of people who have diabetes.

Another 86 million have been diagnosed as being pre-diabetic.

Globally, according to a 2016 report by the World Health Association, an estimated 422 million adults were living with diabetes in 2014, compared to 108 million in 1980. In fact, the global prevalence of diabetes has nearly doubled since 1980, rising from 4.7% to 8.5% in the adult population. Diabetes is on the rise not only in the United States but also around the world, and the complications from diabetes are impacting individuals and their families.

Behind these numbers are people coming to terms with the emotional and physical realities of managing their disease. We mentioned the importance of activity and exercise as well as healthy eating habits. Stress is also an important considering when managing diabetes. Learning to live with diabetes can weigh down the strongest amongst us and that stress can raise your blood sugar. Learning ways to lower stress, from yoga and deep breathing to gardening and listening to your favourite music, can keep your mind in a healthy state. 

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases recommends acquainting yourself with the ABCs: your A1C, Blood Pressure, and Cholesterol. Considering your ABCs can help lower your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes problems. When it comes to your blood pressure, monitoring it is a necessary addition to your daily routine. The key to the lifestyle changes diabetics undergo is having options to monitor glucose levels that are both effective, and affordable.

Technology Makes Monitoring Easier

Active management and monitoring of glucose is neither convenient nor cost effective for many. Some medical professionals recommend up to 10 tests per day. Assuming you have the schedule and discipline to stick with it, most diabetics have had to resort to testing their glucose levels through frequent, invasive needle pricks on their fingers.

There are saliva-testing devices under review by the US Food and Drug Administration, and Google was rumoured to be testing smart contact lenses that could monitor glucose levels as well. But a finger sticks remains the most common test despite the pain of a prick, the need to record readings and do so multiple times per day.

More convenient and accurate methods of testing glucose levels are becoming more readily available. For example, Abbott Laboratories invented the FreeStyle Libre system.

The device has been hailed for its convenience. Placed just under the skin, the sensor continuously measures glucose levels in the interstitial fluid that bathes the cells. Those wearing the device can use their smartphones to get immediate readings. According to Bloomberg, FreeStyle Libre users scanned their sensors an average 16 times a day; some exceeded 45.

While the repeated checks help diabetics lower their glucose levels, Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) systems are costly. Prices can range between $3,000 and $4,000/year, limiting the accessibility of life-saving monitoring. However, companies like Ambrosia Systems are reinventing the wheel, bringing cost savings and convenience to glucose monitoring.

Introducing BluCon
We invented BluCon to build an affordable next generation continuous glucose monitoring like system for diabetic and pre-diabetic patients. Our iOS and Android apps work with Abbot’s FreeStyle Libre sensor, sending glucose readings to any Bluetooth enabled connected device.

Today, two factors prohibit active monitoring and management of diabetes: cost and inconvenience. BluCon quickly reads data from Abbott’s FreeStyle Libre sensor and sends that data to the LinkBluCon mobile app on your phone for less than half the annual cost of available solutions. Our battery life is also twice as long, adding to the convenience and cost savings brought by BluCon.

Living with diabetes entails constant glucose monitoring, which, as we noted, can mean significant lifestyle changes. Checking glucose levels, and keeping an accurate record, can be complicated. BluCon is meant to simplify glucose monitoring and ongoing management of your type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Author
Piyush Gupta

Several years experience in product management worked at Abbott Diabetes Care, Kaiser Permanente, Capital One Bank and a couple of healthcare startups as senior product management executive. Helped companies in building next generation platform, iOS and android mobile products

Blog Series: #IoT in Healthcare by Swetha Jegannathan @csweths


The opportunity in #healthcare IoT is estimated to be $2.5 trillion by 2025. How are we embracing this change? The Types of Opportunities (http://blog.hcitexpert.com/2016/05/infographic-iot-in-healthcare-opportunities.html) that present themselves to the Startups, Healthcare IT organisations are tremendous.
Presenting the insights shared by Swetha Jegannathan (@csweths) on #IoT in Healthcare #PhilipsChat.
Q1: In the near term (1-3 years), What are the top 3 innovations in IoT that can benefit healthcare?:
Swetha Jegannathan:
1. Geriatric Care – IoT is and will continue to be of great value in elderly care, allowing the doctors and care givers to monitor, track and alert when away from their loved ones – especially in cases of neurological disorders like Dementia and Alzheimer.
2. Maternal and Infant Monitoring – IoT, through monitoring devices worn by the individual, can provide timely intervention in the area of maternal and infant health – one of the primary goals of the UN sustainable development agenda.
3. Remote consulting – The low doctor patient ratio in India can be effectively overcome through remote consulting – making patients responsible for their well-being – leading to the doctors and hospitals prioritise focus on emergency and chronic patients.

Note: Since radio frequency is central to most of the IoT innovations, innovator must adhere to protection standards on effects of radio frequency (RF) fields as tabulated by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP, 1998) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE, 2005)

Further the paper “IEEE Standard for Safety Levels with Respect to Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz” also gives few pointers on safe use of the IOT technology. http://emfguide.itu.int/pdfs/C95.1-2005.pdf
Q2: Is an IoT based system going to be a utility or a service?:
Swetha Jegannathan: The system will be successful if offered as a service. Hospitals would be the drivers providing this service to their patients with companies engaged in the manufacture and distribution of medical devices being the enablers of the technology.
Q3. Do you see any device, connected via any protocol and with any cloud; as the future, if yes how will that be achieved? Standards?:
Swetha Jegannathan: RFID based devices connected through the anti-collision protocols and the Apple watch will be the future.

The RFID chips are inserted into the human beings for unique identification and capture of information relating to their general health and well being like blood pressure, weight, blood sugar levels.  The RFID tags can also be used for improving the efficiency of the medicine distribution networks as tracking of the medicines becomes easier.

Prevention of inappropriate usage of the collected information in terms of charging higher insurance premiums or classification of the individuals tracked by the device is one of the biggest challenges to its widespread implementation. However, if used judiciously, healthcare can certainly move from curative to preventive care.

RFID standards need to focus on the following:
– How the RFID systems work
– What frequencies do they operate on and how to use a common frequency across the globe
– Method of data transfer
– Communication between reader and the tags
– Complementary products development compatible to the RFID
 
Q4: In India (or your country), what are the Digital Infrastructure requirements for enabling IoT based Innovations in Healthcare?:
Swetha Jegannathan: In India, most of the patient data is available in physical form and this needs to be converted to electronic form.  Only if 100% of the required data is in electronic form, further analysis can be simplified.
For all the required data to be available electronically and their analysis, high end scanners, significant investment in hardware – to cater to large databases – and software (machine learning – image recognition; AI) to effectively manage data and make decisions. Further, a standard medical data code for data transmission and retrieval is a prerequisite.
Once the data is collected, stored and retrieved efficiently, analysis is accurate and easier leading to appropriate decision making.
Q5. How can hospitals leverage #IoT based solutions for service delivery and patient care? :
Swetha Jegannathan: Some usage of IOT in the indian and international hospitals are given below:
GE used sensors in a New York hospital to track the usage of hospital beds resulting in  optimised occupancy levels and reduced the emergency room wait times by four hours.
e-Alert, a HW/SW solution by Philips Healthcare, virtually monitors the health of its machines to prevent outages. Timely alerts on the wear and tear of the machines leads to savings on replacements and repair.
In India, Manipal Hospitals has been using a wearable device for the expecting mothers to enable doctors to remotely monitor real time information of the growing foetus.
Apollo hospitals has been an early adaptor of IoT in the country in healthcare for accessing patient records at one go with its Unique Hospital Identification initiative across the country.
In addition to the above, the hospitals can leverage IOT in the following areas:
– Clinical decision enablers
– Effective control on hospital borne infections
– Targeted and painless surgery using AI/ VR.
– Connected care pre and post discharge
Q6: What are the aspects of Connected Care for the Patient Care Continuum (https://twitter.com/HCITExpert/status/692309239570628608):
Swetha Jegannathan: Connected care for patient care continuum would include:
1. Preventive health – with regular check-ups, timely alerts and early interventions
2. In-Patient Care – Personalised treatment enabled by technology
3. Post operative care – Remote tracking, consulting and treatment follow-ups using telemedicine and diagnostic tools.
Q7. Please share usecases for Connected Care for: Healthy Living, Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment, Homecare:
Swetha Jegannathan: The use case suggested is based on the premise that it is executed at state level involving the hospitals and care givers.
– The state monitors the citizen’s health using IoT technology – Wearable/ regular check-ups to name a few
– State collects data and, post analysis, alerts the hospitals if there is a deviation from normal
– Concerned citizen and the hospital are in touch and the identified individual is put on preventive treatment with periodic observation of the readings
– If the preventive treatment is successful, then sustenance is monitored through home care including life style changes
– If the preventive treatment is not working for the individual, further investigation is encouraged.  Post investigation, if the individual is diagnosed with the suspected condition, the relevant treatment procedure is given to the individual.
– Monitoring of the progress of the individual’s condition during the treatment is an important step
– On conclusion that the treatment is successful, the hospital, through IOT, will monitor the relevant data periodically.
– The hospital and the individual may decide to have remote follow up consultations till the individual is deemed to be healthy again and there are no signs of relapse.
Q8: What are the Healthcare based Smart City components? How can Local, State and National Government’s make #IoT solutions in healthcare economically viable?:
Swetha Jegannathan:
The following are the healthcare based Smart City components:
– Digital e-health and m-health systems
– Remote patient monitoring leading to customised treatments and medication
– Devices and wearables linking patients with remotely present doctors and nurses
– Data anonymisation
– New innovations on sharing medical learnings that are digitally collected
– Common medical data standards for collection, distribution, analysis and retrieval

The implementation of the Smart City concept in healthcare can be achieved by having a model district containing the above components.  This model needs to be continuously monitored and course corrected (wherever relevant) for it to be successfully expanded to the state, other states and finally the country.

Healthcare based Smart City components, if implemented efficiently, will lead to optimisation of the healthcare costs incurred by the governments.
Q9: How can private hospitals justify the RoI’s of Smart Hospital Components? :
Swetha Jegannathan: Thought, the initial investment and efforts required may be enormous, the patient convenience and hospital resource optimisation through the process streamlining will be worth the efforts and the investment. With the entire patient record being seamlessly available to all the relevant stakeholders, significant savings will be achieved in collecting, sharing and transcribing data – in terms of cost and time. This would also minimise medical errors and, in turn, enhance the reputation of the hospitals in the long run.
Q10: Give us a Buzzword we are going to be hearing regarding IoT based innovations in Healthcare.:
Swetha Jegannathan: Human barcoding
Q11. Tell us a 5 Year view of IoT in Healthcare and what would a Patient Experience in a Smart Hospital?:
Swetha Jegannathan: In 5 years the patients should be able to experience hospitals as wellness clinics with patient centric design in both service and delivery being the priority. This would be achieved if the following plan in implemented in a systematic manner:
– The patient will be assigned to the nearest healthcare facility by the smart city based healthcare network algorithm
– When the patient walks into the hospital (without any physical file), the face recognition technology will retrieve his records and direct him to appropriate department for treatment and physician without any wait time
– Incase of further investigation, the medical record will be sent to the nearest laboratory that then collects the samples from the patient and send the results to the hospitals online for further deciding treatment protocol, including surgeries and therapies. Alternatively for some tests FDA approved diagnostic mobile applications can replace the laborious laboratory tests and share the results instantly with the hospital over the data cloud
– Painless surgeries with targeted robotic precision will be the norm
– During the treatment course (either as in-patient/ out-patient), medical prescription is shared electronically with the pharmacy that delivers the medicine to the patient
– Home care will be an extension of the hospital care with the wearables monitoring the patient’s health and alerting medicine/ therapy schedule
– Physicians will do remote consulting for acute cases, thus freeing them and hospital facilities to attend to only chronic patient in person
– After the recovery stage, the IoT based diagnostic kits will be used to monitor the health of the patient remotely and alert any relapse or detect a new condition

Thus, seamless integration of health system and data without human intervention (or edits) will greatly reduce medical errors and enhance the patient experience.
Q12. Finally: What areas of IoT based innovations are you looking to partner with Startups for? Can you give us two areas?:
Swetha Jegannathan: – Technologies looking at reducing or eliminating the radiation effects of radio frequency that is so central to IoT use cases.
– Smart human centric designs to make healthcare more patient centric without compromising on the human touch.


Stay tuned to the #IoT in Healthcare Blog series Bookmark this link to follow on the insights being shared by the experts on the HCITExpert Blog:

Author
Swetha Jegannathan

Swetha is a lifescience/ healthcare IT consultant with focus on business flow, pre and postsale lifecycle of a software. She has been fortunate to be part of different sub-sectors within the health and life science vertical, be it e-health and m-health at Eli-Lilly Co-Innovation lab for HCL, Singapore or Clinical Data Management & Computation and Laboratory Information Management Software (LIMS) suite at Phase Forward – Waban Software group (now acquired by Oracle) and Ocimum Bioslutions. She has catered to clients across major pharmaceutical majors in US, Europe and South East Asia.

She was instrumental is setting up the DNA sequencing wet lab for MWG Biotech (Now Eurofins), a German company, when they were establishing their base in India in 2004.

Swetha is also passionate about promoting green businesses and innovations that are socially relevant, economically viable and environmentally sustainable. An advocate and practitioner of natural living, she has also done social work assignments with focus on sustainable agriculture, food security and environment. (nominated for the UN Online Volunteering Award in 2010 and her volunteering work was published in UN Online Volunteering newsletter March 2011) and covered in The Strait Times, Singapore national daily.

Specialties: Digital health, Green business, Start-up facilitator, Business Analysis, Consulting, Entrepreneur, Marketing, Social Media, Project Management, Presentation Skills, Networking.

Blog Series: #IoT in Healthcare By Rajesh Batra, @rbatra868


The opportunity in #healthcare IoT is estimated to be $2.5 trillion by 2025. How are we embracing this change? The Types of Opportunities that present themselves to the Startups, Healthcare IT organisations are tremendous.
During the #PhilipsChat, on the 10th April 2017, we asked the experts what they thought about the current trends and focus areas that the IT Industry, Medical Device Manufacturers, Hospitals and Startups will need to keep in view in the near and short-term while making their organisation ready for the Digital Transformation that can be and will be enabled by #IoT in Healthcare.  
Presenting the insights shared by Rajesh Batra (@rbatra868), VP-IT, Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital, Mumbai on #IoT in Healthcare #PhilipsChat.

Q1: In the near term (1-3 years), What are the top 3 innovations in IoT that can benefit healthcare?:
Rajesh Batra: Home care and home physiotherapy

Q2: Is an IoT based system going to be a utility or a service?:
Rajesh Batra: Service

Q3. Do you see any device, connected via any protocol and with any cloud; as the future, if yes how will that be achieved? Standards?:
Rajesh Batra: Yes. Even today, there are trials going on for pregnancy related data coming to hospitals. Elderly care is also happening

Q4: In India (or your country), what are the Digital Infrastructure requirements for enabling IoT based Innovations in Healthcare?:
Rajesh Batra: The cost for thin broad band, which is used in IoT needs to come down

Q5. How can hospitals leverage #IoT based solutions for service delivery and patient care? :
Rajesh Batra: It is an eco system under evolution. We need to wait for a couple of years, when hospitals will be focused on delivery through IoT

Q6: What are the aspects of Connected Care for the Patient Care Continuum (https://twitter.com/HCITExpert/status/692309239570628608):
Rajesh Batra: Elderly care and Preventive care

Q7: What are the Healthcare based Smart City components? How can Local, State and National Government’s make #IoT solutions in healthcare economically viable?:
Rajesh Batra: Not sure of Government role in IoT. It is best done in Public Private partnership to keep it viable. Government can’t be responsible for service delivery. However, government can look into duties for devices and cost of thereof and cost of thin broadband.

Q8: How can private hospitals justify the RoI’s of Smart Hospital Components? :
Rajesh Batra: As said, it is an evolving service. So it needs to be watched closely

Q9: Give us a Buzzword we are going to be hearing regarding IoT based innovations in Healthcare.:
Rajesh Batra: Home care and Elderly care

Q10. Tell us a 5 Year view of IoT in Healthcare and what would a Patient Experience in a Smart Hospital?:
Rajesh Batra: Refer to my presentation at Philips Innovation day https://youtu.be/oxllMGzp6gI

Q11. Finally: What areas of IoT based innovations are you looking to partner with Startups for? Can you give us two areas?:
Rajesh Batra: At the moment, we are in the process of implementing Beacons for a better patient experience at the hospital.

References

  1. Here is the original Blog Post announcing the #PhilipsChat Tweetchat : http://blog.hcitexpert.com/2017/04/philipschat-on-iot-in-healthcare.html
  2. Curated list of Tweets from the #PhilipsChat: https://twitter.com/i/moments/852242427008233473
  3. Review the #PhilipsChat Transcript & analytics via @symplur here >> http://hcsm.io/2loNiv7
  4. [VIDEO] IT to #IoT in Healthcare by @rbatra868 via @PhilipsBlore  https://youtu.be/oxllMGzp6gI

Stay tuned to the #IoT in Healthcare Blog series Bookmark this link to follow on the insights being shared by the experts on the HCITExpert Blog:
Author
Rajesh Batra

VP-IT at Kokilaben Dhirubai Ambani Hospital. Responsible for HIS, ERP implementation along with IT infrastructure initiatives and IT Operations and new IT initiatives.

Blog Series: #IoT in Healthcare by Manishree Bhattacharya @ManishreeBhatt1


The opportunity for #IoT in Healthcare is estimated to be $2.5 trillion by 2025. How are we embracing this change? The Types of Opportunities that present themselves to the Startups, Healthcare IT organisations are tremendous.

During the #PhilipsChat, on the 10th April 2017, we asked the experts what they thought about the current trends and focus areas that the IT Industry, Medical Device Manufacturers, Hospitals and Start-ups will need to keep in view, in the near and short-term, while making their organisation ready for the Digital Transformation that can be and will be enabled by #IoT in Healthcare.  
Presenting the insights shared by Manishree Bhattacharya (@ManishreeBhatt1) on #IoT in Healthcare
Q1: In the near term (1-3 years), What are the top 3 innovations in IoT that can benefit healthcare?
Manishree Bhattacharya: 1. Remote monitoring of (cardiac disorders, COPD, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, insomnia, diabetes, elderly, expecting mothers)
2. An integrated/connected surgical room, where devices are interoperable, regularly feeds in data into patient profile in EMR, to streamline post-operative care, both in the hospital and beyond, at patient homes
3. IoT for ensuring drug/treatment adherence, such as sensor-based pills
Q2. Do you see any device, connected via any protocol and with any cloud; as the future, if yes how will that be achieved? Standards?
Manishree Bhattacharya: Right now, developments are quite random and sporadic. To achieve larger goals, moving from connected devices to connected hospitals, some level of standardization and uniformity will be important to ensure an error-free, and secured transmission.
Q3: In India (or your country), what are the Digital Infrastructure requirements for enabling IoT based Innovations in Healthcare?
Manishree Bhattacharya: Seeing Digital Health take off in India in its full bloom is one of my wishes, and the preliminary requisite would be to encourage hospitals go paper-less – have EHR systems implemented, with a timeline set for nation-wide implementation. Just imagine how seamless healthcare delivery will be if primary, secondary and tertiary centres are integrated – data can seamlessly flow from one centre to another. Government has a very strong role to play here, that will help in creating the right infrastructure, timely adoption, establishing standards, lowering costs by promoting local manufacturing, and boosting HealthIT start-ups.
Q4. Please share use cases for Connected Care for: Healthy Living, Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment, Homecare:
Manishree Bhattacharya:
Healthy Living – Most consumer IoT devices aim to do that – tracking exercise regimes, diet plans
Prevention – Say a heart patient puts on a wearable device that continuously monitors and sends signals to nurses/doctors for any aberration – this can ensure timely treatment and prevent a severe episode.
Homecare – A person who has just had a surgery, and is on homecare – his regular vitals, diet plan, outputs are remotely being tracked by the doctor/nurse – who can selectively revise the diet or post-surgery recovery plan. Same goes with elderly who are on home-care.
Treatment – A sensor-based pill that sends a signal to a care-giver on ingestion of the pill.
The bigger purpose – We know that not all medicines work on every patient. Regularly tracking patients not only help in timely interventions, and more personalized treatments, it also opens routes to more clinical research on personalized medicines.
Q5: What are the Healthcare based Smart City components? How can Local, State and National Government’s make #IoT solutions in healthcare economically viable?
Manishree Bhattacharya: Answering to how can government make IoT solutions viable, my thoughts would be:
  1. By promoting indigenous manufacturing to curb costs
  2. Incentivising IoT adoption in hospitals
  3. Prioritizing HealthIT in the overall start-up agenda
Q6: How can private hospitals justify the RoI’s of Smart Hospital Components?
Manishree Bhattacharya: By improving quality of care; reducing hospital re-admissions, yet prolonging the care process that extends to one’s home; and finally improving patient engagement/adherence. A patient is more likely to visit a doctor who can provide a more personalized treatment than the one who cannot. Important would be define these key metrics/KPIs right at the beginning of implementation.

Q7. Tell us a 5 Year view of IoT in Healthcare and what would a Patient Experience be in a Smart Hospital?
Manishree Bhattacharya: First, we have to understand the purpose of IoT in healthcare – it is not there just for the sake of it, but to truly enable a coordinated and long-term care, that would eventually reduce mortality, morbidity, and hospital re-admissions. Patient experience is bound to improve. A patient will not have to run from one department to another, narrating the whole problem and showing multiple reports. So when a cancer in-patient enters a psychologist’s office, and the doctor already knows the problem, and also has the latest vitals of the patient right in his tablet, he knows that the patient was not able to get any sleep the previous night and has a high BP right now. The doctor would hence probably choose to talk about things that can ease the patient’s current situation. Now, that is truly an enriching experience.

Looking ahead in the future, we may also have AI-enabled voice assistants that will make a patient more comfortable in hospital settings.
Q8. Finally: What areas of IoT based innovations are you looking to partner with Startups for? Can you give us two areas?
Manishree Bhattacharya: Would love to connect with any start-up that can provide meaningful solutions for the Indian healthcare landscape. What I would also like to see is how these start-ups are using the tonnes of data that IoT devices generate, in deriving meaningful analysis – big data, AI, and so on.

References

  1. Here is the original Blog Post announcing the #PhilipsChat Tweetchat : http://blog.hcitexpert.com/2017/04/philipschat-on-iot-in-healthcare.html
  2. 3 ways in which Information Technology can improve healthcare in India by Manishree Bhattacharya (@ManishreeBhatt1) on NASSCOM Community
  1. IoT in India – The Next Big Wave by NASSCOM http://www.nasscom.in/iot-india-next-big-wave
  2. Curated list of Tweets from the #PhilipsChat: https://twitter.com/i/moments/852242427008233473
  3. Review the #PhilipsChat Transcript & analytics via @symplur here >> http://hcsm.io/2loNiv7
Stay tuned to the #IoT in Healthcare Blog series. Bookmark this link to follow on the insights being shared by the experts on the HCITExpert Blog:

http://blog.hcitexpert.com/search/label/IoT%20in%20Healthcare

Author
Manishree Bhattacharya

Manager – Research & Advisory at NASSCOM
Business professional with 7+ years of experience in research and advisory, across IT, healthcare, and medical technologies. At NASSCOM, responsible for identifying digital opportunities, driving thought leadership/innovation and delivering actionable insights for the Indian Technology Industry